Tag Archive | Colombia

Volcanos in Colombia, Literal and Figurative

In Colombia and Latin America, we are experiencing a few eruptions right now.  Mexico is dealing with Popocatepetl located close to Mexico City.  Meanwhile Colombia is facing the rumblings of Nevado de Ruiz. Nevado de Ruiz has been causing problems for a few weeks now, and the language used to describe the volcano is rich with literal and figurative uses — erupt, explode, blow up, rumble... the list of colorful verbs goes on.

Volcano movie

Why do we use so much volcano vocabulary? Volcanos are very powerful forces in nature.  According to the above movie they could destroy the world.  Some say they did — the world of the dinosaurs was destroyed by volcanos according to some research. Volcanos are so powerful they have been thought to be the homes of gods.  A humerous movie with Tom Hanks captures this idea in Joe versus the Volcano. Volcanos are violent and unpredictable so volcano vocabulary is often related to angry actions.  So what volcano-related words and phrases can we use?

Rumble  – LITERALLY a deep, heavy, somewhat muffled, continuous sound [ruido sordo, el ruido de volcan]

The volcano rumbled ominously as they approached.

FIGURATIVELY a widespread murmur of discontent [murmullo de quejas]

The CEO noted there had been rumblings among the personnel about the change in coffee brands.

Barney Belches, The Simpsons

Barney belches because of beer.

Belch – to emit contents violently or spasmodically [eructar]

The volcano belched ash and sulferous gases into the air.

The boy belched loudly after drinking the Coca Cola.

Spew / vomit – to send or be sent out in a stream, sometimes in disgust or anger [vomitar, arrojar]

The volcano spewed lava through the night.

The angry words spewed from the employee without thought.

Erupt – to eject or burst forth suddenly and violently, as from restraint [entrar en erupción, estallar]

The volcano erupted without warning, covering Pompey in lava.

All of a sudden Mark Cuban erupted and began yelling at the referee.

Blow up / Explode – LITERALLY to burst, fly into pieces, break up violently with a loud report or noise [hacer explotar]

FIGURATIVELY to burst forth violently or emotionally, especially with noise,laughter, violent speech [explotar, estallar]

The volcano exploded like a bomb.

The boss blew up when he learned his employees were stealing.

Blow One's Top

Uh oh. He is blowing his top!

Blow one’s top / blow one’s stack – LITERALLY explode [hacer explotar]

FIGURATIVELY go crazy with rage, lose one’s composure, become insane [cabrearse, enfadarse muchisimo]

Here’s a great article by AOL News using ‘blow’s one’s top’ in relation to an unexpected action by a flight attendant.

People describe Steven Slater as a nice guy, but yesterday the flight attendant for JetBlue apparently totally lost control following an argument with a passenger.

Slater was working on a flight from Pittsburgh that had landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, when he was hit on the head by a bag a passenger was pulling out early from an overhead compartment.

According to the New York Daily News, words were exchanged and Slater’s reaction was to blow his top. He spewed profanity at stunned passengers, grabbed a beer and activated the plane’s emergency slide, then bolted off the plane.

Passengers told the News as part of his rant, Slater, 38, said he planned to quit the airline.

A JetBlue co-worker who was on the flight, calls Slater a working-class hero.

“It’s something we all fantasize about,” she tells the newspaper. “But we have kids and a mortgage or are just too chicken – or sane – to go through with [it].”

Ready to blow up because English is too hard? Don’t blow your stack, contact Bogota Business English to help you learn English without the frustration!

Use this new vocabulary here in the comments or on our Facebook page or Twitter.

Original definitions provided by Dictionary.com

Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

…Juegos de palabra, la relacion entre Colombia y Corea y sus Chaebol

(version español)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

Speaking of Relationships...

It’s Valentine’s Day week so let’s talk about relationships. Free trade commercial relationships. 😉

In this post, we’ll take another look at puns and some great articles on South Korea, one of  Colombia’s new free trade partners.  This commercial relationship will gain more importance over the next several years and now is the time to get ahead of it or prepare ourselves for future deals between Korea and Colombia.

The language of international business is English.  That’s why Bogota Business English is such a great way to improve your professional prospects by getting your English to the next level. Prepare yourself!

We’ve bolded some words or phrases that we’ll explain below.  Also try to determine which words or phrases are puns  Forget what a pun is? Review here.  The following excellent article comes from the Economist’s SEOUL desk and discusses the Chaebol or conglomerate problem in South Korea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wow.  This article was full of puns! I counted 7 puns. And you?

We’ve learned a little bit more about Colombia’s new trading partner, now lets understand some of the vocabulary.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Interested in understanding the Chaebols further? See this other great Economist article.

Need to improve your English to trade with Korea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Juegos de palabra, La relacion entre Colombia y Corea y Chaebol

…Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

(version ingles – english version)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

A propósito de relaciones...

Es la semana de día de san valentin.  Pues hablamos de relaciones… ¡relaciones comerciales! 😉

Miramos otra vez a los juegos de palabras o puns y algunos articulos sobre el estado de la economía en Corea de Sur, uno de los nuevos socios de libre comercio con Colombia.  Esta relacion comercial va a leventar en importancia durante los proximos años. Ya debemos prepararnos para los tratos futuros entre Colombia y Corea.

El idioma de negocio internacional es inglés.  Por esta razon  Bogota Business English es una herramienta excelente para mejorar su futuro profesional mediante aprender inglés. ¡Prepárate!

Hemos puesto unas palabras al negro abajo y las explicamos más adelante.  Mira a las palabras y cuenta la cantidad de puns. Olvidaste que es un pun? Recuerdate.  El  articulo excelente a contuniacion viene de The Economist y sus escritores de SEOUL, COREA y trata el problema de los Chaebol o los conglomerados en Corea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wau. Este articulo estaba llenisimo de puns. Conté 7 y tu?

Hemos aprendido de nuevo socio comercial… y ya aprendemos el vocabulario.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Estás interesado en aprender más de los Chaeobol? Mira a este otro articulo de The Economist.

Necesita mejorar su inglés para negociar con Corea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

At y to, las preposiciones en inglés, parte 1

…English Prepositions: 

At and to, part 1

Too often I hear errors with at and to when talking with Bogotanos.  We’re going to  try to help fix these errors with this first post on prepositions at and to. We’ll break it down from the easy to the hard.

EASY DIFFICULTY

We are meeting at the transmillenium station.

We are meeting at the transmillenium station.

The preposition at is used to show a specific position or direction. To is used to show movement.

  • I met her at the transmillenium station. (Position, a specific place)
  • She was at her parents’ house.  (Position, a specific place)
  • We are going to the transmillenium station. (Movement in the direction of the tranmuylleno station)
  • I am going to Medellín to see him. (Movement in the direction of Medellín)
Your turn!
The conversation club is ___ Authors Bookstore and Cafe.
Yes, I will go ____ the conversation club.
I meet friends ___ Juan Valdez.
Sometimes I like to fly ___ Cartagena. Then go ___ Tayrona.
Can’t talk now! I’m running ___ Juan Valdez.
Answers
Fly to Caratagena

Fly to Caratagena

The conversation club is at Authors Bookstore and Cafe.
Yes, I will go to the conversation club.
I meet friends at Juan Valdez.

Sometimes I like to fly to Cartagena. Then go to Tayrona.

Can’t talk now! I’m running to Juan Valdez.

MEDIUM DIFFICULTY

At can be used with some common verbs related to our hands and eyes. Examples are: look, smile, wink, stare, wave, frown, point etc. We use at because the the perception is directed at a position.

  • The girl smiled at me. (She directs her smile at me)
  • Why are you looking at her like that? (You direct your look at her)
  • She waved at me. (She directed her wave at me)
When I arrived at the cafe, Juan Valdez smiled at me!

When I arrived at the cafe, Juan Valdez smiled at me!

At is also used after action verbs like shoot, laugh, throw, arrive, excel, succeed,  and shout to indicate the direction of the action.

  • The girl laughed at the clown. (The girl directs her laugh at the clown.)
  • Don’t throw stones at the cat. (Do not direct your throw at the cat)
  • Why are you shouting at me? (Why are you shouting toward me?)
Your turn!
The child pointed ___  Montserrate.
The cat looked ____ the empty food bowl.
The shopkeeper stared ____ the blond foreigner.
The boy winked ____ the girl.
We arrived ____ the conversation club and smiled ___ all the people.
Answers
Nelson laughs at someone.

Nelson points and laughs at someone.

The child pointed at  Montserrate.
The cat looked at the empty food bowl.
The shopkeeper stared at the blond foreigner.
The boy winked at the girl.
We arrived at the conversation club and smiled at all the people.
Part 2 will have some of the trickier uses of to and at.

Where are you at with your English? Want to get to a new level? Think about personalized classes with Bogota Business English.

Como se pronuncia Busy

Busy Bee pronuncia Busy asi Bzzzi

A Busy Bee!

Here’s a simple exercise to improve a very common word.  This word is common yet many Spanish speakers struggle to pronounce it well.

Busy – Occupied. (ocupado)

Pronounce “Busy.”  Go ahead. Did it sound like…

If so, congrats!  If not, let’s work on some rhyming words.

Fizzy – Carbonated (espumoso)

Dizzy – light-headed, spinning feeling (mareado)

Gaseosa Fizzy

Postobon soda is fizzy!

Fizzy and dizzy are pronounced as they look.. Fizi. Dizi. And busy is actually pronounced the same! Bizi.

So let’s practice pronouncing Busy, Fizzy, Dizzy.

My day is busy. The Sprite is fizzy. I feel dizzy.

He is busy.  The Colombiana is fizzy. The roller coaster looks dizzy.

Busy. Fizzy. Dizzy.

Good luck with your busy pronunciation!

Speaking of busy, personalized classes are the perfect answer for the busy professional that wants to improve their English. Contact Bogota Business English for your personalized program. Don’t get dizzy from English!

Me hace dizzy!

Uf, dizzy!

Divertido significa fun o funny?

Does divertido mean fun or funny?

En nuestra serie ‘errores comunes en Bogota’, notamos unos errores de pronunciación o malentendimiento de la parte de Colombianos.  ¿Cometes uno de los errores comunes?

Baby's Sexy and Baby Knows It

This Baby is Funny

There is a common mistake that I’ve noticed while teaching English to Spanish speakers.  For some reason, somewhere in their learning path, they have confused two very different adjectives.

Fun – enjoyable (divertido)

Funny – weird, amusing or causing laughter (chistoso)

Weeee is the sound that fun makes

This is fun. Never call it funny.

In English the two words sound similar but are worlds apart.  Think about this: Motorcycles are fun.  Clowns are funny.

Dates are fun. Jokes are funny.

Soccer is fun. Gringos speaking bad Spanish is funny.

Lets review some examples from awkward conversations:

Jeff: Tom check out my new motorcycle.

Tom: Wow, Jeff your motorcycle looks funny.

(NO! It looks fun. It looks funny means it looks weird.)

Tom: I love this joke. It is fun.

(Jokes are funny! Jokes can be fun but we probably mean funny.)

Tom: Janet I hope you enjoyed our date.

Janet: Thanks so much. It was really funny.

(NO! Funny dates mean weird dates.  Dates should be fun!)

Typical Confused Conversation

Tom: My weekend was funny. (meaning: My weekend was weird.)

Jack: How so? What happened?

Tom: I played football and watched movies. (Tom should have said his weekend was fun)

Jack: What? That doesn’t sound weird.

Use fun and funny correctly in your next conversation.  Some good conversation practice can be enjoyed at the Bogota Business English Conversation Club.

Como se puede explicar en ingles los puestos ambulantes?

…How can You Explain the Colombian Push Carts in English?

Colombian Push Cart

Push carts are part of the informal economy

The folks at Jack Magazine did a great job explaining the Colombian push carts.  This is something that just does not exist in US, Canada, UK or Europe and you might want to explain it to someone when you are in one of those countries. Reed the article now. (It is good practice.)

La gente a Jack Magazine hizo un buen trabajo en explicar los carritos de los vendedores ambulantes cual se ven en la calle.  No existen los carritos en otros paises tales como EEUU, Canada, RU o Europa. Leer más. (Es buena practica.)

Some good vocabulary // vocabulario debe recordar:

Push cart =  shopping cart or other wheeled cart that you can push // el carrito del puesto ambulante

Decontextualized = removed from its normal context // sacado del contexto normal

Convenience store = a store with common items // tienda

Informal employment sector = the part of the work force that is not reported to the government, typically do not pay taxes // la parte de la fuerza laboral que no paga los impuestos ni informa al gobierno

Speak of something = mention something // mencionar algo

Hardship =  financial difficulties // pernuria

Desperation =  the state of being reckless or dangerous because of despair or urgency // desesperación 

Daily survival =  the daily act of staying healthy, happy and unaffected by hardships // sobrevivencia diaria

MacGyver = secret agent character from TV show MacGyver did amazing things with basic items, like stop or diffuse a bomb with a paperclip. // agente secrete del serie de TV MacGyve que consigó logros estupendos con articulos basicos, tal como detener una bomba con un clip.

Cobble = fix or put together roughly // arreglar de manera bruta

Baby carriage = baby stroller // cochecito de niño

Milk crate = a slatted wooden box // caja madera de lamas

Scrap = little piece // pedacito

Pedestrian =  pertaining to walkers // peatonal

Fishing pole =  rod used to fish //  caña de pescar

Pirate ship = a boat used by buccaneers // barco de pirata

Super-deluxe = very luxuriousv// de super lujo

On-board =  installed and functional // instalado

Main sail = principle area of canvas or other fabric to catch the wind // vela mayor

Main deck = principle floor-like area at a certain hull level// cubierta principal

Snack =  light refreshment // algo para picar

Safety first! =  common saying when following the safety instructions found on any item // dicho común cuando  sigando las instrucciones de seguridad que encontarías sobre toda manera de articulos

Storefront display = large windowed area facing pedestrian or other traffic// en exhibición por el escaparate

Item = element // articulo

Cash register = a business machine that indicates to customers the amounts of individual sales, has a money drawer from which to make change, records and totals receipts, and may automatically calculate the change due. // caja (la con la moneda)

Need English for your daily survival at work? Don’t cobble together English sentences with a client! Recieve personalized classes with Bogota Business English.

10 Rituales de buen agüero y otros costumbres de año nuevo para Colombia

..10 Colombian New Year’s Eve Traditions

(leer en inglés – english version here)

Start your trip on NYE

Some Colombian traditions are about travel.

¡Feliz año!

Entiendo que  llegamos a la segunda semana de enero sino es sin duda la primera vez que llegas al blog o bogota para muchos de ustedes. 🙂

Quiremos subir esta entrada cultural para prepararse a hablar de año viejo en inglés.  Despues de leer, debería tener la capaz de hablar de los agueros y costumbres de año nuevo con extranjeros.

Discutimos 10 agueros celebrados en Colombia.  Damos la versión en inglés con nuevos vocabulario y verbos.

Los siguientes acciones deben hacer para el año nuevo en Colombia

1.  Poner lentejas en los bolsillos para que no falte dinero

Put dry lentils in your pockets so you’ll always have money in the new year

2.  Comer 12 uvas por cada més y hacer un deseo por uva

Eat 12 grapes, one for each month, and make a wish for each grape

3.  Correr la vuelta  a la manzana con una maleta para viajar durante el año nuevo

Run around the block with your suitcase or backpack if you want to travel in the new year

4.  Ponerse calzones amarillos para la abundancia o rojos para el amor

Wear yellow underwear to not lack for anything, or red to have luck with love

5.  Poner en la mesa trigo con unos billetes para que no falten el dinero y  la comida sobre la mesa

Put wheat and some bills on the table so that you’ll always have money and food on the table

6.  Estrenar limpio y con ropa nueva para que entre el nuevo año bien, y que el nuevo año sigue así

Wash up and put on new clothes so you can look good when you enter the new year. The idea is that you’ll continue looking good through the year.

7.  Subirse una silla para que todo lo malo pase por debajo

Get on a chair and let all the bad of the last year pass by below.

8.  De la silla,  las mujers dar el primer saludo de año a un hombre y los hombres a una mujer para ue no falte el amor

While on the chair, women say their first hello of the new year to a man while men do the same to a women so that they’ll success in love and relationships.

9.  Hacer una comida familiar y muy grande, con mucha variedad para que no falte comida en año nuevo

Have a big family meal with alot of variety so that you have alot of food in the new year.

10.  Un Juego: Dejar 3 papas (una pelada, una media pelada y una normal) abajo de la cama y a media noche agarar una sin verla… papa pelada significa problemas, papa media pelada significa dinero de más o menos  y papa no pelada significa mucho dinero en año nuevo.

Game:  Leave 3 potatoes, 1 peeled, one half peeled, and 1 normal, under the bed and at midnight go and grab one without looking. If you get the peeled potato, it means you’ll have money problems. The half peeled means money situation will be okay.  The normal potato will mean lots of money in the new year.

Eat a Grape and Make a Wish!

Eating Grapes is a NYE Tradition

Qué otros agueros o costumbres celebras o has escuchado?  Deja sus comentarios en inglés o español y les ayudamos traducir o redactar.

Cubremos otro costumbre, lo de hacer metas para el año … leer más!.  Si tiene una meta de estudiar más inglés, programa algunas clases de inglés con Bogota Business English.

10 Colombian Traditions for New Year’s Eve

..10 Rituales de buen agüero y otros costumbres de año nuevo para Colombia

(leer en español)

Start your trip on NYE

Some Colombian traditions are about travel.

Happy New Year!

OK, it may be the second week of January but this is probably the first time back at the blog for many of you. 🙂

We wanted to put up this cultural piece so you’re ready to discuss what you did with for the past new year’s and what you’ll do at next year’s.  After this post you will be able to talk about the traditions with any foreigner!

Lets break down some of those new year’s eve traditions .

Things you have to do for the Colombian New Year:

1.  Poner lentejas en los bolsillos para que no falte dinero

Put dry lentils in your pockets so you’ll always have money in the new year

2.  Comer 12 uvas por cada més y hacer un deseo por uva

Eat 12 grapes, one for each month, and make a wish for each tomato

3.  Correr la vuelta  a la manzana con una maleta para viajar durante el año nuevo

Run around the block with your suitcase or backpack if you want to travel in the new year

4.  Ponerse calzones amarillos para la abundancia o rojos para el amor

Wear yellow underwear to not lack for anything, or red to have luck with love

5.  Poner en la mesa trigo con unos billetes para que no falten el dinero y  la comida sobre la mesa

Put wheat and some bills on the table so that you’ll always have money and food on the table

6.  Estrenar limpio y con ropa nueva para que entre el nuevo año bien, y que el nuevo año sigue así

Wash up and put on new clothes so you can look good when you enter the new year. The idea is that you’ll continue looking good through the year.

7.  Subirse una silla para que todo lo malo pase por debajo

Get on a chair and let all the bad of the last year pass by below.

8.  De la silla,  las mujers dar el primer saludo de año a un hombre y los hombres a una mujer para ue no falte el amor

While on the chair, women say their first hello of the new year to a man while men do the same to a women so that they’ll success in love and relationships.

9.  Hacer una comida familiar y muy grande, con mucha variedad para que no falte comida en año nuevo

Have a big family meal with alot of variety so that you have alot of food in the new year.

10.  Un Juego: Dejar 3 papas (una pelada, una media pelada y una normal) abajo de la cama y a media noche agarar una sin verla… papa pelada significa problemas, papa media pelada significa dinero de más o menos  y papa no pelada significa mucho dinero en año nuevo.

Game:  Leave 3 potatoes, 1 peeled, one half peeled, and 1 normal, under the bed and at midnight go and grab one without looking. If you get the peeled potato, it means you’ll have money problems. The half peeled means your money situation will be okay.  The normal potato means lots of money in the new year.

Eat a Grape and Make a Wish!

Eating Grapes is a NYE Tradition

What other New Year’s Eve traditions do you practice? Leave your comments, spanish or english, and we’ll provide a translation.

We cover another New Year tradition, creating resolutions, in this post.  If your resolution is to study more English, contact Bogota Business English.

Do You Know What a Pun Is?

…Sabes que significa pun?

Today we’ll break down the article presented the other day. It is brimming with coffee and puns.  There’s great vocabulary in it but first we start by counting the number of puns. Puns are word games where one word is used but has several meanings other than the intended or where a similar sounding word is used instead of the proper word.

Many newspapers love to write in puns for their titles or descriptions and the WSJ was no different.  I counted 3 puns in last week’s post.  How many did you count?

Hoy discutimos el articulo cual te presentamos el otro día.  Está lleno de café y juegos de palabra. Hay vocabulario nuevo pero empezamos con la cuenta de juegos de palabra o en inglés un pun.  

Muchos periodicos les encantan a escribir con juegos de palabra en los titulos o capciones y el WSJ no era diferente. Conté 3 juegos de palabra en el articulo, y tu?

Pun List

Trouble Brewing / Trouble Brews in Colombia (title)
Brew
is the verb we use when we say we make coffee “I brewed some coffee”.  But we also say trouble brews or starts to make noise.

Brew es un verbo que usamos cuando hacemos el tinto; también hay un dicho sobre los problemas y el verbo brew.

Don’t Bug Me Until I’ve Had My Coffee (image)
Bug is a verb that means to annoy or hastle someone. But it is also a noun meaning an insect. The article was about a bug affecting the coffee crop!

Bug es un verbo que significa molestar o fastidiar a alguien; también es un sustantivo con el significado de un bicho o insecto. El articulo trató un bicho que afecta el café.

Filtering Through… (graph title)
Filter
is a verb which means to screen or eliminate some elements in a group based on certain properties. We filter data like on an excel sheet.  But we also filter our coffee when we use a paper or metal filter (noun).

Filter es un verbo que significa filtrar o eliminar según algunas propiedades unos elementos no deseados de un grupo.  Filtramos data en una hoja de calculo; también filtramos nuestro tinto para quitar el grano molido, en tal caso usamos un filter (sustantivo) o en español un filtro.

Vocabulary, picture version!

”]Steep and Verdant Slopes of Colombia
Clipping the Bushes with a Pair of Clippers

To Clip (verb)

A Seedling Held in a Hand

A Seedling (noun)

Gloomy Day in Bogota

Gloomy (adjective)

To Demur is to Delay in Very Formal Situations

To Demur (verb). To delay or object to action in a very formal situation. Demorar u objetar a tomar una accion usualmente usado en una situación formal. 
 An Infestation of Bugs on a Leaf
An Infestation (noun)
Shirts Can Shrink After Washing

To Shrink (verb)

Soldiers Holding Their Ground

To Hold Ground (verb)

Don’t let your English skills shrink! Hold your ground with some personalized classes from Bogota Business English!