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Volcanos in Colombia, Literal and Figurative

In Colombia and Latin America, we are experiencing a few eruptions right now.  Mexico is dealing with Popocatepetl located close to Mexico City.  Meanwhile Colombia is facing the rumblings of Nevado de Ruiz. Nevado de Ruiz has been causing problems for a few weeks now, and the language used to describe the volcano is rich with literal and figurative uses — erupt, explode, blow up, rumble... the list of colorful verbs goes on.

Volcano movie

Why do we use so much volcano vocabulary? Volcanos are very powerful forces in nature.  According to the above movie they could destroy the world.  Some say they did — the world of the dinosaurs was destroyed by volcanos according to some research. Volcanos are so powerful they have been thought to be the homes of gods.  A humerous movie with Tom Hanks captures this idea in Joe versus the Volcano. Volcanos are violent and unpredictable so volcano vocabulary is often related to angry actions.  So what volcano-related words and phrases can we use?

Rumble  – LITERALLY a deep, heavy, somewhat muffled, continuous sound [ruido sordo, el ruido de volcan]

The volcano rumbled ominously as they approached.

FIGURATIVELY a widespread murmur of discontent [murmullo de quejas]

The CEO noted there had been rumblings among the personnel about the change in coffee brands.

Barney Belches, The Simpsons

Barney belches because of beer.

Belch – to emit contents violently or spasmodically [eructar]

The volcano belched ash and sulferous gases into the air.

The boy belched loudly after drinking the Coca Cola.

Spew / vomit – to send or be sent out in a stream, sometimes in disgust or anger [vomitar, arrojar]

The volcano spewed lava through the night.

The angry words spewed from the employee without thought.

Erupt – to eject or burst forth suddenly and violently, as from restraint [entrar en erupción, estallar]

The volcano erupted without warning, covering Pompey in lava.

All of a sudden Mark Cuban erupted and began yelling at the referee.

Blow up / Explode – LITERALLY to burst, fly into pieces, break up violently with a loud report or noise [hacer explotar]

FIGURATIVELY to burst forth violently or emotionally, especially with noise,laughter, violent speech [explotar, estallar]

The volcano exploded like a bomb.

The boss blew up when he learned his employees were stealing.

Blow One's Top

Uh oh. He is blowing his top!

Blow one’s top / blow one’s stack – LITERALLY explode [hacer explotar]

FIGURATIVELY go crazy with rage, lose one’s composure, become insane [cabrearse, enfadarse muchisimo]

Here’s a great article by AOL News using ‘blow’s one’s top’ in relation to an unexpected action by a flight attendant.

People describe Steven Slater as a nice guy, but yesterday the flight attendant for JetBlue apparently totally lost control following an argument with a passenger.

Slater was working on a flight from Pittsburgh that had landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, when he was hit on the head by a bag a passenger was pulling out early from an overhead compartment.

According to the New York Daily News, words were exchanged and Slater’s reaction was to blow his top. He spewed profanity at stunned passengers, grabbed a beer and activated the plane’s emergency slide, then bolted off the plane.

Passengers told the News as part of his rant, Slater, 38, said he planned to quit the airline.

A JetBlue co-worker who was on the flight, calls Slater a working-class hero.

“It’s something we all fantasize about,” she tells the newspaper. “But we have kids and a mortgage or are just too chicken – or sane – to go through with [it].”

Ready to blow up because English is too hard? Don’t blow your stack, contact Bogota Business English to help you learn English without the frustration!

Use this new vocabulary here in the comments or on our Facebook page or Twitter.

Original definitions provided by Dictionary.com

Oh What a Beautiful Morning, inspiración para empezar la semana

Este miércoles discutimos música en el club de conversación, de las 6 hasta las 8 en Authors Bookstore, calle 70, no 5 23.  Infórmate aquí. Vamos a escuchar una canción esta mañana para inspirarnos.

Attitude is Everything

The image says everything.

Se dice que la actitud es todo. Attitude is everything. Hoy es el inicio de la semana y debemos aprovecharlo. Sacamos el jugo de el dia de hoy.

Si piensas el dia es bueno, pues el dia es bueno.  Vamos a hacer un experimentado. Escucha esta canción con letra y piensa “it is a beautiful day, everything is going my way”  …la explicación está a continuación.

FYI : La canción viene de las obras musicales de Rodgers and Hammerstein.  Son muy interesantes a ver y escuchar. Youtube tiene bastante otras obras de ellos.

There’s a bright golden haze on the meadow

There’s a bright golden haze on  the meadow

The corn is as high as an elephant’s eye

And it looks like its climbing clear up to the sky

Oh, what a beautiful morning

Oh, what a beautiful day

I got a beautiful feeling

That everything’s going my way

Oh, the sounds of the earth are like music

Oh, the sounds of the earth are like music

The breeze is so busy it doesn’t miss a tree

And the weeping willow is laughing at me

Oh what a beautiful morning

Oh what a beautiful day

I got a beautiful feeling

That everything’s going my way.

Oh what a beautiful day.

Haze – a reduced visibility in the air as a result of condensed water vapor, dust, etc, sometimes shimmers due to reflecting light from particles [bruma, calima]

Everything is going my way – Life is going well for me, my life is lucky/blessed [me pasa bien, he tenido suerte en alguna esfuerza, he sido bendecido]

Weeping willow – a willow tree whose branches droop or bend toward the ground [un árbol como sauce llorón]

It’s a beautiful day to start English classes.  Personalized english classes from Bogota Business English are waiting for you, just a click away!

Sleeping at Work, Dormir en el trabajo

Asleep at work or just boxes?

Sleeping at Work, view 1. (HT The Clearly Dope)

Definitely asleep!

Sleeping at work, view 2. (HT The Clearly Dope)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Friday.  Maybe we were out late celebrating International Women’s Day.  Maybe it is just a rough morning.  Maybe you are asking “How can I catch a few zzz’s?”  We have the box method above.  Also, check out this funny video on ways to sleep at work.

Not enough time in the day to sleep and travel blocks and kilometers to class? Take a personalized class that comes to your home or office.  Contact Bogota Business English.

Vocabulary

To sleep = the state of unconciousness that recharges the body, usually at night. [dormir]

To be asleep = a descriptive but passive way of describing someone/something sleeping. [estar dormido]

To catch zzz’s = to sleep

To catch some shuteye = to sleep

To nod off = to go to sleep [empezar a dormir]

A Rough Morning = a difficult morning [una mañana dura]

To be out late = to be having fun or party to a late hour [salir hasta la madrugada]

To stay up late = to not go to sleep until a late hour [no acostarse hasta la madrugada]

To not sleep well = to have difficulty with the right amount or the right quality of sleep [no dormir bien]

A good night’s rest = sleeping well for the right amount or right quality of sleep [una noche de dormir bien]

 

NOTE: Bogota Business English does not endorse sleeping at work!! We recommend you get a good night’s rest and a full breakfast in order to be as productive as possible. 🙂

Bogota Business English has well-rested, passionate andfun teachers that keep students active and interested in learning.  Don’t fall asleep in another class again! Contact Bogota Business English.

Qué es un Fellow?

My Fellow Earthicans - Futurama - Richard NixonQué es un “fellow”?  Usamos la palabra en inglés con mucha frecuencia en situaciones formales, en educación y en las peliculas del siglo 1800.  Explicamos a continuación.

Qué dice Google translator? Pues, demasiado y no suficiente.

compañero
tipo
miembro
prójimo
sujeto
chico
socio
tío
igual
pareja
Puchicas! La traducción es complicada.  Necesitamos definir la palabra en inglés.  Podemos leer un diccionario pero igual, los diccionarios son demasiados especificos.  Mira lo que salió en dictionary.com. Es demasiado largo y complicado además no nos dice los usos más comunes.
1. a man or boy: a fine old fellow; a nice little fellow.
2. Informal . beau; suitor: Mary had her fellow over to meet herfolks.
3. Informal . person; one: They don’t treat a fellow very wellhere.
4. a person of small worth or no esteem.
5.a companion; comrade; associate: They have been fellowssince childhood.
6. a person belonging to the same rank or class; equal; peer:The doctor conferred with his fellows.
7. one of a pair; mate; match: a shoe without its fellow.
8. Education.
a. a graduate student of a university or college to whoman allowance is granted for special study.
b. British . an incorporated member of a college, entitled tocertain privileges.
c. a member of the corporation or board of trustees of certain universities or colleges.
9. a member of any of certain learned societies: a fellow of the British Academy.
10. Obsolete . a partner.
Como un nativo de EEUU, puedo decir que hay tres significados de “fellow” debería notar:
  • Alguién del mismo grupo social como el sujeto o hablador de una oración.
    • My fellow Bogotanos, do you agree the traffic is bad?
  • Alguién recibiendo una beca para estudiar en detalle algo, usualmente por una universidad pero a veces por un programa especial de gobierno
    • Many Fulbright Fellows are studying in Colombia.
  • Jerga para un chico/tipo que estaba usado en los otros siglos. A veces todavia escuchamos la versión corrupta de la palabra como “fella” en inglés informal
    • Look at that fella, he sure is tall!
Ahora puedes decir a tus compañeros de clase…
Fellow classmates, English is great!
‘FELLOW’ …Uso formal (con Richard Nixon)
‘FELLA’ …Uso informal (con Jack Nicholson!)

Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

…Juegos de palabra, la relacion entre Colombia y Corea y sus Chaebol

(version español)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

Speaking of Relationships...

It’s Valentine’s Day week so let’s talk about relationships. Free trade commercial relationships. 😉

In this post, we’ll take another look at puns and some great articles on South Korea, one of  Colombia’s new free trade partners.  This commercial relationship will gain more importance over the next several years and now is the time to get ahead of it or prepare ourselves for future deals between Korea and Colombia.

The language of international business is English.  That’s why Bogota Business English is such a great way to improve your professional prospects by getting your English to the next level. Prepare yourself!

We’ve bolded some words or phrases that we’ll explain below.  Also try to determine which words or phrases are puns  Forget what a pun is? Review here.  The following excellent article comes from the Economist’s SEOUL desk and discusses the Chaebol or conglomerate problem in South Korea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wow.  This article was full of puns! I counted 7 puns. And you?

We’ve learned a little bit more about Colombia’s new trading partner, now lets understand some of the vocabulary.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Interested in understanding the Chaebols further? See this other great Economist article.

Need to improve your English to trade with Korea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Juegos de palabra, La relacion entre Colombia y Corea y Chaebol

…Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

(version ingles – english version)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

A propósito de relaciones...

Es la semana de día de san valentin.  Pues hablamos de relaciones… ¡relaciones comerciales! 😉

Miramos otra vez a los juegos de palabras o puns y algunos articulos sobre el estado de la economía en Corea de Sur, uno de los nuevos socios de libre comercio con Colombia.  Esta relacion comercial va a leventar en importancia durante los proximos años. Ya debemos prepararnos para los tratos futuros entre Colombia y Corea.

El idioma de negocio internacional es inglés.  Por esta razon  Bogota Business English es una herramienta excelente para mejorar su futuro profesional mediante aprender inglés. ¡Prepárate!

Hemos puesto unas palabras al negro abajo y las explicamos más adelante.  Mira a las palabras y cuenta la cantidad de puns. Olvidaste que es un pun? Recuerdate.  El  articulo excelente a contuniacion viene de The Economist y sus escritores de SEOUL, COREA y trata el problema de los Chaebol o los conglomerados en Corea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wau. Este articulo estaba llenisimo de puns. Conté 7 y tu?

Hemos aprendido de nuevo socio comercial… y ya aprendemos el vocabulario.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Estás interesado en aprender más de los Chaeobol? Mira a este otro articulo de The Economist.

Necesita mejorar su inglés para negociar con Corea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

When Can Confidence and Success Be Bad For Business

…Cuando Pueden Ser Malo La Confianza y El Exitó Para Su Negocio?

(version español haz clic acá)

This is part of the 7 habits of bad business leaders series.  Check out the other parts here. The purpose of the series is to break down the English language in Eric Jackson’s Forbes article for non-native speakers.

Confidence and success are usually good in business.  There are a couple of situations where these qualities in a leader can be very bad.  When confidence and success begin to distort a leader’s reality, companies suffer.

Bad Habit #6: Bad leaders underestimate obstacles

Warning Sign:  Excessive hype

Bad Habit #7: Bad leaders stubbornly rely on what worked for them in the past

Warning Sign: Constantly referring to what worked in the past

Vocabulary:

The mona lisa is distorted.

The Mona Lisa is distorted to look like an alien.

To distort is to misrepresente or give a false, perverted meaning to  something.

To underestimate is to calculate or think something is less than it is.

Obstacles exist in business

We face many obstacles in business.

An obstacle is a challenge or hurdle.

Something excessive is too much of something.

Hype is exagerrated publicity of something or the dramatic and exciting promotion of something.  It usually emphasizes a very positive and sometimes false version of reality. Something hyped is something promoted  in a dramatic way or emphasizing characteristics that may not be real.

To stubbornly act is to act despite being told not to. A stubborn person is one that think they are right even when they are told they are not.

The mule is acting stubbornly

Mules act stubbornly

Bad habit 6 idea: Habit 6 leaders think challenges are less difficult than they are. While leaders need to be positive, they sometimes are too positive and do not recognize reality. Maybe they isolated themselves from people that told them the naked truth. (See habit 3 and 4)

Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

The Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

The warning sign of these leaders is that to they believe the  promoted version, the hyped public releases.  In difficult times, this can be disasterous for companies.  During good economics times, this can lead to very risky decisions or beliefs that cause problems for the company down the road.

There is a fairy tale about believing the hype called The Emperor’s New Clothes. In this story the emperor is convinced to believe that his new clothes could only be seen by those worthy to see them.  In reality there were no clothes and  a small child pointed this out. In the end the emperor looked very stupid.  The consequences in business go beyond looking stupid to hurting future business deals, financing and losing customer support.

Bad habit 7 idea: These leaders believe the present is like the past. They had success in the past and do not recognize the present is not the same.  Similar to believing the hype, these leaders do not see how their past successes don’t connect with the present.  These leaders are not talking about the future but instead the past.
Overcome your English learning obstacles with Bogota Business English and their personalized programs.

Wait, Hope, Expect y Esperar

In our series ‘common errores for Spanish speakers in English’ we have come across  native Spanish speakers that are used to using one verb in Spanish  esperar for 3 different meanings but in English we have 3 different verbs for these meanings. En nuestra serie de ‘errores comunes de español hablantes’ encontramos este problema de esperar. […]

How attention-seeking leaders are bad for business

…Como los liders que buscan atención son malos para el negocio

(versión en español aquí)

Attention Seeking Tantrum

Attention seeking can be bad!

This is part of the 7 habits of bad business leaders series.  Check out the other parts here. The purpose of the series is to break down the English language in Eric Jackson’s Forbes article for non-native speakers.

You want to call attention to your business, right? Well, maybe. We’re going to look at the habit of bad leaders that can cause problems for themselves and their companies.

See the other articles in the series on leader isolation and behavior choices. Bad habit source material comes from Eric Jackson’s excellent Fobes article.

Bad habit #5: Leaders are consummate spokespersons, obsessed with the company image

Warning Sign:  Blatant attention-seeking

Habit 5 vocabulary: To be consummate is to be very skilled or perfect.

Company image or public image  is how the company is percieved by the public or by others.

Being obsessed is having a obsession o preocuppation with something. An obsession dominates and strongly influences one’s thoughts, feelings and desires.

Attention Seeking can lead to bad behavior

Bad attention-seeking behavior

A blatant action is a deliberate action or done on purpose.

Attention-seeking behavior is acting in a way such as  that calls attention to oneself.

Habit 5 idea: The idea is that these leaders are very skilled or perfect  at public interaction.  While this is good but they also are excessively preoccupied (obsessed) and spend less time on real problems and more time on what people think.

Uribe was seeking attention on Twitter

Sometimes attention-seeking causes a negative public image

The warning sign of this habit can itself be a problem. Attention-seeking behavior distracts from the business and its goals.  Though leaders want good public image, the opposite sometimes results from attention-seeking behavior!

Former President Uribe has recieved criticism for his attention-seeking tweets and political endorsements.  He seems obsessed with the image of his presidency. This attention seeking behavior has actually hurt his public image according to some.

Bogota Business English is an institute that makes learning fun and interactive with our consummate or excellent professional teachers.

Como los liders que buscan atención son malos para el negocio

…How attention-seeking leaders are bad for business

(versión en inglés aquí)

Attention Seeking Tantrum

Buscar atencion puede ser malo

Esta entrada es la primera parte del serie sobre los 7 habitos de malos lideres de negocio y se pueden mirar las otras partes acá. El proposito del serie es discutir el inglés usado en el articulo de Eric Jackson para hablantes no nativos.

Quieres llamar atención a tu negocio, no? Uhhm, quizás.  Vamos a ver un habito de los lideres malos que causa problemas para ellos mismos y sus empresas.

Bad habit #5: Leaders are consummate spokespersons, obsessed with the company image

Warning Sign:  Blatant attention-seeking

Vocabulario habito 5: To be consummate es perfecto o bien habil.

Company image o public image  es como se ve la empresa por el publico u otras partes.

To be obsessed significa tener una obsesion o preocupacion grave de algo o alguíen. Un obsession domina y influye bien los pensamientos, sentimientos y deseos de la persona.

Attention Seeking can lead to bad behavior

Que malo buscador de atencion

Un acción blatant es deliberada o heco a propositó.

Comportamiento de attention-seeking es actuar de una manera que llama atención a una persona misma.

La idea, habito 5 La idea es que los lideres son muy habiles o casi perfecto a la interaccion social y publica.  Es una habilidad buena aunque los lideres están preocupados demasiados (obsessed) y usan menos tiempo tratando los problemas verdaderas y más tiempo tratando de manejar la imagen de la empresa.

Uribe was seeking attention on Twitter

Buscar atencion a veces causa una imagen publica negativa

El señal de avertencia para este habito, comportamiento de busca atención, se puede ser un problema.  El comportamiento distrae la atención de empleados y el lider mismo del funcionamiento y las mestas de la empresa. Aunque los lideres queren una imagen publica buena, el contrario resulta a veces de su comportamiento de busca atención!

Por ejemplo, ex Presidente Uribe ha recibido criticos por que hizo unos tuits-tweets y refrendo political para llamar atención a la marca Uribe.  Se dice que está obsessed o obsessionado con la imagen de su presidencia pasada. Según a unos, el comportamiento de busca atención ha dañado su imagen.

Bogota Business English es un instituto que hace que el aprendizaje es divertido y interactivo debido de una parte a  nuestros profesores consummate o excelentes.