Archive | February 2012

Qué es un Fellow?

My Fellow Earthicans - Futurama - Richard NixonQué es un “fellow”?  Usamos la palabra en inglés con mucha frecuencia en situaciones formales, en educación y en las peliculas del siglo 1800.  Explicamos a continuación.

Qué dice Google translator? Pues, demasiado y no suficiente.

compañero
tipo
miembro
prójimo
sujeto
chico
socio
tío
igual
pareja
Puchicas! La traducción es complicada.  Necesitamos definir la palabra en inglés.  Podemos leer un diccionario pero igual, los diccionarios son demasiados especificos.  Mira lo que salió en dictionary.com. Es demasiado largo y complicado además no nos dice los usos más comunes.
1. a man or boy: a fine old fellow; a nice little fellow.
2. Informal . beau; suitor: Mary had her fellow over to meet herfolks.
3. Informal . person; one: They don’t treat a fellow very wellhere.
4. a person of small worth or no esteem.
5.a companion; comrade; associate: They have been fellowssince childhood.
6. a person belonging to the same rank or class; equal; peer:The doctor conferred with his fellows.
7. one of a pair; mate; match: a shoe without its fellow.
8. Education.
a. a graduate student of a university or college to whoman allowance is granted for special study.
b. British . an incorporated member of a college, entitled tocertain privileges.
c. a member of the corporation or board of trustees of certain universities or colleges.
9. a member of any of certain learned societies: a fellow of the British Academy.
10. Obsolete . a partner.
Como un nativo de EEUU, puedo decir que hay tres significados de “fellow” debería notar:
  • Alguién del mismo grupo social como el sujeto o hablador de una oración.
    • My fellow Bogotanos, do you agree the traffic is bad?
  • Alguién recibiendo una beca para estudiar en detalle algo, usualmente por una universidad pero a veces por un programa especial de gobierno
    • Many Fulbright Fellows are studying in Colombia.
  • Jerga para un chico/tipo que estaba usado en los otros siglos. A veces todavia escuchamos la versión corrupta de la palabra como “fella” en inglés informal
    • Look at that fella, he sure is tall!
Ahora puedes decir a tus compañeros de clase…
Fellow classmates, English is great!
‘FELLOW’ …Uso formal (con Richard Nixon)
‘FELLA’ …Uso informal (con Jack Nicholson!)

Por Qué Inglés es Tan Complicado?

…or Why is English so Complicated?

Si necesitas clases de ingles, contacta Bogota Business English hoy para un programa personalizado de aprender inglés.

USA es una mezcla de gente

A melting pot or mix

They call the USA a melting pot country because to many diferent nationalities, ethnicities and types of people live there.

The same can be said for the English language.  Take ten minutes to listen to this great youtube series on the English language’s origin.  English has bits or small parts of German, Scandinavian, French, Church Latin, Anglo-Saxon and Celtic in its common structure and vocabulary.  These days American English is also including many Spanish words (pronounced Gringo-style).

There is a great youtube video series out there on this origin.  We’ll start with part 1 of 10.  The narrator or speaker has a very fast pronunciation so we’re reproducing the sections each week with text.

The History of English in 10 minutes

Chapter 1 Anglo Saxon, or whatever happened to the Jutes

The English language begins with the phrase “Up yours Ceasar!” as the Romans leave Britain and a lot of Germanic tribes start flooding in.

Tribes such as the Angles and Saxons,  who together give us the term “anglo-saxon” and the Jutes, who didn’t.

The Romans left some very straight roads behind but not much of their language.  The Anglo-saxon vocab was much more useful as it was mainly words for simple, everyday things such as house, woman, cliff and werewolf.

Four of our days of the week were named for the Anglo saxon gods. They didn’t bother with Saturday, Sunday, and Monday as they had all gone off for a long weekend.

While they were away, Christian missionaries stole in bringing with them leaflets about jumble sales, all in latin.

Christianity was a hit with the locals and made them much happier to take on funky new words from latin like martyr, bishop and font.

Along came the Vikings with their action-man words drag, ransack, thrust and die.  They may have raped and pillaged but they were also into give and take. 2 of around 2000 words they gave english, as well as the phrase: “Watch out for that man with the enormous axe.”

Whew! Good job! Check back next week for part 2. Or follow us on Facebook and receive updates on this blog and others. Click here.

If English is still very dificult for you or you need to improve your pronunciation or conversation skills, why don’t you contact Bogota Business English for personalized classes.

At y to, las preposiciones en ingles parte 2

…English Prepositions: 

At and to, part 2

Too often I hear errors with at and to when talking with Bogotanos.  We’re going to  try to help fix these errors with this second post on prepositions at and to. We’ll break it down from the easy to the hard.  We covered the easy here.  Now on to…
WHA?! QUEE?!

THE HARD

Just because English wants to give you nightmares, it is possible sometimes but now always to exchange  for at.

To can be used for some verbs of perception just like at. Sometimes to is the only correct preposition, sometimes to changes the meaning of the phrase and sometimes at and to are interchangabe.  Its okay if you are cursing right now.  But let’s start looking at this:

  • When you are in trouble, look to your parents for help. (When you are in trouble, turn to your parents for help.) MEANING CHANGED
  • She waved to me. (She waved at me.) INTERCHANGABLE
  • He smiled to himself when he guessed the correct answer.  (**Special exception to smile at which we only use for the reflexive case) ONLY TO USED WHEN REFLEXIVE, NOT AT.

To can also be used for some action verbs such as throw and shout.  We use to when we want to emphasize the action connects to the recipient. In effect, we’re changing the meaning of the verb with the preposition.

  • Don’t throw food to the animals. (Do not throw food so that the animals get it) MEANING CHANGED
  • Could you shout to James and tell him we are leaving? (Please shout at James, but so that he hears you) MEANING CHANGED

At this point we have to acknowledge that the verb+AT or verb+TO combination when not following our EASY and MEDIUM DIFFICULTY rules. must be memorized because a single rule no longer applies.  We’re referring to meaning changes and special exceptions.  To help you with your memorization, here is a list of special cases we use to:

adapt to

add to

adjust to

admit to

agree to

belong to

cater to

confess to

consent to

contribute to

drink to

happen to

listen to

look forward to

nod to

object to

react to

reply to

respond to

subscribe to

toast to

talk to

turn to

Did you find this lesson difficult? Need to practice your verb+prepositions with an experienced teacher? Check out Bogota Business English and their personalized programs.

Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

…Juegos de palabra, la relacion entre Colombia y Corea y sus Chaebol

(version español)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

Speaking of Relationships...

It’s Valentine’s Day week so let’s talk about relationships. Free trade commercial relationships. 😉

In this post, we’ll take another look at puns and some great articles on South Korea, one of  Colombia’s new free trade partners.  This commercial relationship will gain more importance over the next several years and now is the time to get ahead of it or prepare ourselves for future deals between Korea and Colombia.

The language of international business is English.  That’s why Bogota Business English is such a great way to improve your professional prospects by getting your English to the next level. Prepare yourself!

We’ve bolded some words or phrases that we’ll explain below.  Also try to determine which words or phrases are puns  Forget what a pun is? Review here.  The following excellent article comes from the Economist’s SEOUL desk and discusses the Chaebol or conglomerate problem in South Korea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wow.  This article was full of puns! I counted 7 puns. And you?

We’ve learned a little bit more about Colombia’s new trading partner, now lets understand some of the vocabulary.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Interested in understanding the Chaebols further? See this other great Economist article.

Need to improve your English to trade with Korea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Juegos de palabra, La relacion entre Colombia y Corea y Chaebol

…Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

(version ingles – english version)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

A propósito de relaciones...

Es la semana de día de san valentin.  Pues hablamos de relaciones… ¡relaciones comerciales! 😉

Miramos otra vez a los juegos de palabras o puns y algunos articulos sobre el estado de la economía en Corea de Sur, uno de los nuevos socios de libre comercio con Colombia.  Esta relacion comercial va a leventar en importancia durante los proximos años. Ya debemos prepararnos para los tratos futuros entre Colombia y Corea.

El idioma de negocio internacional es inglés.  Por esta razon  Bogota Business English es una herramienta excelente para mejorar su futuro profesional mediante aprender inglés. ¡Prepárate!

Hemos puesto unas palabras al negro abajo y las explicamos más adelante.  Mira a las palabras y cuenta la cantidad de puns. Olvidaste que es un pun? Recuerdate.  El  articulo excelente a contuniacion viene de The Economist y sus escritores de SEOUL, COREA y trata el problema de los Chaebol o los conglomerados en Corea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wau. Este articulo estaba llenisimo de puns. Conté 7 y tu?

Hemos aprendido de nuevo socio comercial… y ya aprendemos el vocabulario.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb – slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière – French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter – core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing – a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe –list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Estás interesado en aprender más de los Chaeobol? Mira a este otro articulo de The Economist.

Necesita mejorar su inglés para negociar con Corea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Como se dice la frase recuerdame? Remind me? Remember me?

Hay una palabra traviosa en español que traduce a dos palabras en inglés…

Remember Me Robert Pattison Terrible

Remember, the movie Remember Me is awful.

Recordar.  Remind or Remember. What’s the difference??

Esta leccion sale de una experiencia con estudiantes usando de manera mala las dos frases .

Remind me? We saw that movie last night together.

Remember me what is the English word for horrible.

Remind me es recuerdame.   Remember me es recuerdame.  Uups no parece tan claro y de eso viene la confusión.

Es que el verbo remind solo usamos cuando queremos dar un recordatorio a alguíen o viceversa.

I will remind you that the conversation club is Wednesday evening.

Remind me to Remind me to Remind me

Remind me to remind you about the verb Remind

El verbo remember usamos para la invocacion de recuerdos. Decimos de otra manera en español el verbo acordarse para remember.

I remember how much fun my students had at our last class.

Entonces la frase “Remind me? I was your date last night” traduce literalamente a  “Me das un recordatorio a mí? Vimos juntos esa pelicula anoche.”  QUE?! Whaaa?
Y la frase “Remember me what is the English word for horrible.” traduce directamente a “Acuerdame qué es la palabra de inglés para horrible.”  Uhhhhh?

Serían mejor así:

Remember me? We saw that movie last night together.

Remind me what is the English word for horrible.

Entonces REMEMBER o recuerda la diferencia!  Si necesitas REMIND YOURSELF o darte un recordatorio, revisita esta pagina!

I don’t need to remind you that Bogota Business English has excellent classes. Check them out!

At y to, las preposiciones en inglés, parte 1

…English Prepositions: 

At and to, part 1

Too often I hear errors with at and to when talking with Bogotanos.  We’re going to  try to help fix these errors with this first post on prepositions at and to. We’ll break it down from the easy to the hard.

EASY DIFFICULTY

We are meeting at the transmillenium station.

We are meeting at the transmillenium station.

The preposition at is used to show a specific position or direction. To is used to show movement.

  • I met her at the transmillenium station. (Position, a specific place)
  • She was at her parents’ house.  (Position, a specific place)
  • We are going to the transmillenium station. (Movement in the direction of the tranmuylleno station)
  • I am going to Medellín to see him. (Movement in the direction of Medellín)
Your turn!
The conversation club is ___ Authors Bookstore and Cafe.
Yes, I will go ____ the conversation club.
I meet friends ___ Juan Valdez.
Sometimes I like to fly ___ Cartagena. Then go ___ Tayrona.
Can’t talk now! I’m running ___ Juan Valdez.
Answers
Fly to Caratagena

Fly to Caratagena

The conversation club is at Authors Bookstore and Cafe.
Yes, I will go to the conversation club.
I meet friends at Juan Valdez.

Sometimes I like to fly to Cartagena. Then go to Tayrona.

Can’t talk now! I’m running to Juan Valdez.

MEDIUM DIFFICULTY

At can be used with some common verbs related to our hands and eyes. Examples are: look, smile, wink, stare, wave, frown, point etc. We use at because the the perception is directed at a position.

  • The girl smiled at me. (She directs her smile at me)
  • Why are you looking at her like that? (You direct your look at her)
  • She waved at me. (She directed her wave at me)
When I arrived at the cafe, Juan Valdez smiled at me!

When I arrived at the cafe, Juan Valdez smiled at me!

At is also used after action verbs like shoot, laugh, throw, arrive, excel, succeed,  and shout to indicate the direction of the action.

  • The girl laughed at the clown. (The girl directs her laugh at the clown.)
  • Don’t throw stones at the cat. (Do not direct your throw at the cat)
  • Why are you shouting at me? (Why are you shouting toward me?)
Your turn!
The child pointed ___  Montserrate.
The cat looked ____ the empty food bowl.
The shopkeeper stared ____ the blond foreigner.
The boy winked ____ the girl.
We arrived ____ the conversation club and smiled ___ all the people.
Answers
Nelson laughs at someone.

Nelson points and laughs at someone.

The child pointed at  Montserrate.
The cat looked at the empty food bowl.
The shopkeeper stared at the blond foreigner.
The boy winked at the girl.
We arrived at the conversation club and smiled at all the people.
Part 2 will have some of the trickier uses of to and at.

Where are you at with your English? Want to get to a new level? Think about personalized classes with Bogota Business English.

When Can Confidence and Success Be Bad For Business

…Cuando Pueden Ser Malo La Confianza y El Exitó Para Su Negocio?

(version español haz clic acá)

This is part of the 7 habits of bad business leaders series.  Check out the other parts here. The purpose of the series is to break down the English language in Eric Jackson’s Forbes article for non-native speakers.

Confidence and success are usually good in business.  There are a couple of situations where these qualities in a leader can be very bad.  When confidence and success begin to distort a leader’s reality, companies suffer.

Bad Habit #6: Bad leaders underestimate obstacles

Warning Sign:  Excessive hype

Bad Habit #7: Bad leaders stubbornly rely on what worked for them in the past

Warning Sign: Constantly referring to what worked in the past

Vocabulary:

The mona lisa is distorted.

The Mona Lisa is distorted to look like an alien.

To distort is to misrepresente or give a false, perverted meaning to  something.

To underestimate is to calculate or think something is less than it is.

Obstacles exist in business

We face many obstacles in business.

An obstacle is a challenge or hurdle.

Something excessive is too much of something.

Hype is exagerrated publicity of something or the dramatic and exciting promotion of something.  It usually emphasizes a very positive and sometimes false version of reality. Something hyped is something promoted  in a dramatic way or emphasizing characteristics that may not be real.

To stubbornly act is to act despite being told not to. A stubborn person is one that think they are right even when they are told they are not.

The mule is acting stubbornly

Mules act stubbornly

Bad habit 6 idea: Habit 6 leaders think challenges are less difficult than they are. While leaders need to be positive, they sometimes are too positive and do not recognize reality. Maybe they isolated themselves from people that told them the naked truth. (See habit 3 and 4)

Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

The Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

The warning sign of these leaders is that to they believe the  promoted version, the hyped public releases.  In difficult times, this can be disasterous for companies.  During good economics times, this can lead to very risky decisions or beliefs that cause problems for the company down the road.

There is a fairy tale about believing the hype called The Emperor’s New Clothes. In this story the emperor is convinced to believe that his new clothes could only be seen by those worthy to see them.  In reality there were no clothes and  a small child pointed this out. In the end the emperor looked very stupid.  The consequences in business go beyond looking stupid to hurting future business deals, financing and losing customer support.

Bad habit 7 idea: These leaders believe the present is like the past. They had success in the past and do not recognize the present is not the same.  Similar to believing the hype, these leaders do not see how their past successes don’t connect with the present.  These leaders are not talking about the future but instead the past.
Overcome your English learning obstacles with Bogota Business English and their personalized programs.

Cuando Pueden Ser Malo La Confianza y El Exitó Para Su Negocio?

…When Can Confidence and Success Be Bad For Business?

(version inglés click here)

Esta entrada es la primera parte del serie sobre los 7 habitos de malos lideres de negocio y se pueden mirar las otras partes acá. El proposito del serie es discutir el inglés usado en el articulo de Eric Jackson para hablantes no nativos.

La confianza y el exito usualmente son buenos para el negocio.  Aunque hay unas situaciones cuando sea malo las calidades indicadas que se manifestarian en un lider.  Cuando la foncianza y el exito distorcionan la perspectiva de realidad de un lider, la empresa sufre.

Bad Habit #6: Bad leaders underestimate obstacles

Warning Sign:  Excessive hype

Bad Habit #7: Bad leaders stubbornly rely on what worked for them in the past

Warning Sign: Constantly referring to what worked in the past

Vocabulario:

The mona lisa is distorted.

La Mona Lisa está distorted.

To distort significa distorsionar o pervertir el significado de algo.

To underestimate significa subestimar, calcular mal o pensar que algo es menos que es.

Obstacles exist in business

Nos enfrentan varios obstacles en negocio.

An obstacle significa un obstaculo o un reto o una valla.

Algo excessive es algo excesivo o demasiado de alguna calidad.

Hype es la publicidad  con bombos y platillos, es decir la publicidad exagerada.  Usualmente se pone una cara muy positiva y a veces falsa sobre un producto, empresa o algo promocinado. Algo hyped es algo promocionado de manera dramatica y con enfasis de cosas tal vez falsas o no 100% verdaderas.

To stubbornly act significa hacer algo de manera terca o hacer algo a pesar de la solicitud de no hacerlo. Una persona stubborn es una persona terca o que piensa tiene toda la razon a pesar de opinas al contratio.

The mule is acting stubbornly

Los burros son stubborn

Habito malo 6 la idea: Los lideres de clase habito 6 cree que los obstaculos son menos complicado que son. Es la verdad que los lideres deben poner positivos, a veces ellos son demasiados positivos y no reconocen la realidad. Tal vez se ailaron de gente que les dijo la verdad. (Mira los habitos malos 3 y 4)

Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

The Emperor's New Clothes and Hype

La avertencia de tales lideres es que no solo promocionar de manera exagerada pero creen lo que promocionan.  Durante los momentos malos de las empresas, la creencia en los comunicados de prensa resultará muy mal para la empresa.  La creencia le deja al lider tomar decisiones riesgosas o mantener cosas que solo va a causar problemas.

Hay un cuento de hadas sobre este comportamiento se llama  The Emperor’s New Clothes.  En esta historia, el emperador está convencido a creer que la ropa nueva solo se puede ver por los merecidos.  En realidad, no había ningun trapo de ropa.  Al final de cuento, el emperador se vio como un bobo.

En negocio las consequenias van más alla que parecer estupido a dañar las ofertas de negocio, el financimiento y el resbaldo de clientes.

Habito malo 7 la idea: Los lideres malos creen que el presente es igual al pasado.  Los éxitos del pasado van a seguir con los mismos métodos y no reconoce el presente es lo  mismo que el pasado.  Ellos hablan no de planes del futuro pero acciones del pasado.  Ellos no creen un comunicado de prensa pero siguen viviendo en un mundo irreal.  Esta auto decepción va a causar problemas para la empresa.
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