Tag Archive | Juegos

Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

…Juegos de palabra, la relacion entre Colombia y Corea y sus Chaebol

(version español)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

Speaking of Relationships...

It’s Valentine’s Day week so let’s talk about relationships. Free trade commercial relationships. ;)

In this post, we’ll take another look at puns and some great articles on South Korea, one of  Colombia’s new free trade partners.  This commercial relationship will gain more importance over the next several years and now is the time to get ahead of it or prepare ourselves for future deals between Korea and Colombia.

The language of international business is English.  That’s why Bogota Business English is such a great way to improve your professional prospects by getting your English to the next level. Prepare yourself!

We’ve bolded some words or phrases that we’ll explain below.  Also try to determine which words or phrases are puns  Forget what a pun is? Review here.  The following excellent article comes from the Economist’s SEOUL desk and discusses the Chaebol or conglomerate problem in South Korea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wow.  This article was full of puns! I counted 7 puns. And you?

We’ve learned a little bit more about Colombia’s new trading partner, now lets understand some of the vocabulary.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb - slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière - French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter - core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing - a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe -list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Interested in understanding the Chaebols further? See this other great Economist article.

Need to improve your English to trade with Korea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Juegos de palabra, La relacion entre Colombia y Corea y Chaebol

…Puns, Colombia’s Relationship to Korea and Chaebols

(version ingles – english version)

TLC entre Colombia y Correa

A propósito de relaciones...

Es la semana de día de san valentin.  Pues hablamos de relaciones… ¡relaciones comerciales! ;)

Miramos otra vez a los juegos de palabras o puns y algunos articulos sobre el estado de la economía en Corea de Sur, uno de los nuevos socios de libre comercio con Colombia.  Esta relacion comercial va a leventar en importancia durante los proximos años. Ya debemos prepararnos para los tratos futuros entre Colombia y Corea.

El idioma de negocio internacional es inglés.  Por esta razon  Bogota Business English es una herramienta excelente para mejorar su futuro profesional mediante aprender inglés. ¡Prepárate!

Hemos puesto unas palabras al negro abajo y las explicamos más adelante.  Mira a las palabras y cuenta la cantidad de puns. Olvidaste que es un pun? Recuerdate.  El  articulo excelente a contuniacion viene de The Economist y sus escritores de SEOUL, COREA y trata el problema de los Chaebol o los conglomerados en Corea.

Bakers and chaebol in South Korea

Let them eat cake

A half-baked effort to curb the conglomerates

SOME parents give their children cakes. A few give them cake shops. The hot topic in South Korea is the trend for daughters and grand-daughters of chaebol families to open bakeries and other small food outlets. The chaebol are the conglomerates that dominate the Korean economy, so these plutocratic pâtissières have deeper pockets than any of the little bakers they compete against.

Their baking has provoked outrage. Lee Myung-bak, South Korea’s president, calls it a “hobby” business for rich girls that threatens the livelihood of poor shopkeepers. Lee Ju-young, a member of the national assembly, likens it to Park Ji-sung (Manchester United’s Korean midfielder) lording it over amateurs in a backstreet game of football. A restaurateur in Seoul puts it more plaintively: “These families already control everything else in Korea. Why can’t they leave something for the rest of us?”

The chaebol families have decided that this is not a battle worth picking. Scions of the Samsung, LG and Hyundai dynasties are all hanging up their aprons. Artisée, a chain of swanky pastry shops run by Lee Boo-jin, whose dad is the chairman of Samsung, is to close. So is the Hyundai-affiliated Ozen.

Whether this will help small bakers much is open to question. Artisée has only 27 shops; Ozen a mere two. Both are cupcakes in comparison to SPC Group, which operates more than 3,000 Paris Baguette shops in Korea. Buns have always been SPC’s bread and butter—and its boss is not an heiress.

Some say all this pie-throwing distracts attention from the real problems that overmighty chaebol cause. Entrepreneurs complain that if they have a good idea, the chaebol show up with their chequebooks and poach their staff. Small firms that supply chaebol complain that they are ruthlessly squeezed, though few dare say so publicly.

Consumers also suffer. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (FTC) detected over 3,500 cases of price-fixing in 2010, but only 66 led to fines. The average penalty amounted to just 2.3% of unfairly earned revenue. Samsung and LG were fined in January for fixing the prices of notebook PCs and flat-screen televisions between June 2008 and September 2009. Samsung was ordered to pay a fine of 25.8 billion won ($23m); LG, 18.8 billion won. LG’s fine is to be waived, in return for co-operation with the FTC. This is the third time the two firms have been caught price-fixing in the past two years.

Politicians follow the same old recipes when dealing with the chaebol. They lean on banks to lend cash to small firms. And they lean on the chaebol to stay out of a few minor businesses, such as baking or tofu-making. However you sugarcoat it, this is not serious reform.

Wau. Este articulo estaba llenisimo de puns. Conté 7 y tu?

Hemos aprendido de nuevo socio comercial… y ya aprendemos el vocabulario.

Let them eat cake – famous quote attributed to Queen Marie Antoinette that implies socio-economic divisions (PUN b/c references food) [que coman pasteles]

half-baked – badly planned or executed (PUN b/c references food) [mal concebido, medio cocinado]

curb - slow down or stop something. [refrenar, poner freno a algo]

chaebol – Korean word for the conglomerates that control much of the Korean economy. French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [conglomerado en Corea]

pâtissière - French word for pastry. (English borrows many words!) [confitería]

battle not worth picking – an argument or fight that is more trouble than it is worth [no vale la pena la molestia]

scion – descendent [descendiente]

hang up something – give up something or quit some activity [colgar algo, renunciar participar en alguna actividad]

Peyton Manning is hanging up his pads and giving up football.

apron –  a garment or clothing article covering part of the front of the body and tied at the waist, for protecting the wearer’s clothing. (PUN b/c used to make food) [delantel]

swanky – fancy [elegante y lujoso, tal vez ostentoso]

bread and butter - core area. (PUN b/c references food) [pan de cada día]

Bavaria’s bread and butter is beer.

pie-throwing - a silly and messy fight [pelea con pasteles]

chequebook – British  English for checkbook. [chequera]

poach – to illegally hunt and kill. Used metaphorically it means to break rules in order to gain something or someone. [cazar furtivamente]

price-fixing – illegally setting a price between several parties so that the consumer pays more than is normal [pacto ilícito para fijar artificialmente los precios ]

same old something – an often repeated something that is not desired [el mismo algo de siempre]

Most institutes have the same old format with standardized content. Nothing is personalized like Bogota Business English!

recipe -list of ingredientes and steps to achieve something, usually a dish or food item (PUN b/c references food) [receta]

lean on – pressure (politically) or threaten [presionar a alguien]

sugarcoat – make a bad situation seem better with positive words. (PUN b/c references food)  [disfrazar, endulzar]

You can’t sugarcoat what is happening in Greece.

Estás interesado en aprender más de los Chaeobol? Mira a este otro articulo de The Economist.

Necesita mejorar su inglés para negociar con Corea? Talk to Bogota Business English.

Bug in the Coffee, Trouble Brewing


Coffee Pun: Don't Bug Me Until I've Had My Coffee

Been awhile since you read english? Are you rusty? Probably not as rusty as the coffee crop in Colombia!  The folks at WSJ covered an interesting situation developing in Colombia.  We’ll break down some of the language in our next post.  The article has some puns or the humerous use of a word that has different meanings because of the context.  The article’s title is a good example: Trouble Brews for Coffee (because you can brew coffee too!)

How many puns can you count??

Hace rato que no lees en inglés? Necesitas ayuda? Sin duda no necesitas tanta ayuda como la cosecha de granos de café en Colombia.  La gente de WSJ informa sobre una situación que se viene desarrollando en Colombia.  Discutimos el articulo y unas frases o palabras importantes en la próxima entrada.  El articulo tiene muchos juegos de palabras o “puns” en ingles. Por ejemplo:  Se hace mal el café (porque hacemos café también!). 

Cuantos juegos de palabra puede contar?

From the Wall Street Journal, writer Leslie Joseph:

On the steep and verdant slopes here, an orange-colored fungus is laying waste to hundreds of thousands of acres of coffee.

Rust Leaf

Bloomberg News. A farmer holds a leaf from a Colombian coffee plant that is infected with the rust fungus.

The infestation, and efforts to eradicate it, raises the specter of higher coffee futures—and more expensive cups of espresso—for months to come.

The fungus is known as roya, the Spanish word for “coffee rust.” It grows on the leaves of a coffee plant and chokes off nutrients to the beans. Encouraged by years of torrential rains, roya has spread throughout Colombia, forcing farmers to pull out their plants and replace them with fungus-resistant seedlings.

Juan María Cañar, a 64-year-old farmer in the Nariño region in southwest Colombia, said he was forced to replant much of his acreage. He usually produces 1,500 kilograms (3,300 pounds) of coffee beans. “This season, I’ll have about half that,” he said.

The fungus has ruined what was supposed to be a good year for Colombia, the world’s second-largest producer of high-quality arabica coffee, the mild-flavored, hand-picked beans for which coffee traders usually pay a premium.

As much as 10% of the country’s coffee-growing region, or about 300,000 acres, were replanted this year in a bid to get rid of the scourge. New plants typically take as long as three years before they produce their beans. This is likely to restrict supplies, sending prices higher.

Investors have been paying scant attention to the potential crisis. Futures for arabica coffee, the variety most commonly brewed in the world, have been falling along with other commodities, amid gloomy headlines out of Europe.

However, the declines are smaller than those for other exotic agricultural commodities. Coffee prices have fallen 7.4% this year, while cotton has dropped 40%, and cocoa is down 28%. On Tuesday, coffee for March delivery settled 1.5% higher, at $2.2280 per pound.

“It’s not selling off quite like the others are,” said Kona Haque, a commodities analyst atMacquarie Bank. “Coffee is holding its ground.”

Analysts say the warning signs flashing in the coffee market will soon become more visible through the uncertainty caused by Europe’s debt crisis. “The fundamental picture is taking a back seat because everyone is worried about Europe,” said Marcio Bernardo, an analyst at brokerage Newedge.

The problems in Colombia come as global coffee supplies already are strained. The last crop out of Brazil, the supplier of more than one-third of the world’s coffee, was a relatively small one. Additionally, Central America was hit by heavy rains at the start of its harvest in October, which are expected to clip production in El Salvador and Guatemala.

World output of arabica coffee will shrink 4.3% to 79.6 million bags in the current crop year, which began in October, according to the London-based International Coffee Organization.

The National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia, or Fedecafe, isn’t giving a firm forecast for next year’s crop, saying estimates are hard to make given the large amount of rain that came down this winter.

For the past three seasons, the quasigovernmental organization set lofty production goals but came up short. The fact that they are demurring this year is telling, says Jack Scoville, a broker at Price Futures Group.

[MKTLEDE]

“They’re trying to be very cautious as to what they say,” Mr. Scoville said.

Analysts say that in the best-case scenario, Colombia’s output in 2012 could be comparable to this year’s, which Fedecafe expects to total around eight million bags, each weighing 60 kilograms. In a good year, Colombia produces about 11 million bags.

Meanwhile, demand for coffee is growing. Consumption has risen 2.5% every year on average over the past decade, the ICO said, citing the growth of niche markets and new consumers in emerging markets.

Problems in the euro zone could pinch global demand as the European Union has the highest coffee consumption per capita in the world.

Another factor that could mitigate Colombia’s production problems is Brazil, which is forecast to harvest a big crop next year.

Last week, Brazil’s National Coffee Council said the country will produce as much as 52 million bags, a 18% increase over last year. The council’s forecast is conservative compared with private estimates that are closer to 60 million bags.

However, Brazil’s harvest doesn’t begin until May. Until then, the market must grapple with another possible shortfall from Colombia.

How many puns did you count? Cuántos juegos de palabra notaste?

Don’t let your English get rusty!  Bogota Business English will polish your vocabulary and grammar skills while helping you shine at work and at home!

Don’t be a Grinch!

It’s that classic film, the How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  It is a difficult film for non native speakers because Dr. Seuss the writer liked to make up or create words and use real words that no one used.  Here are the lyrics, guess what words are real!

Es una pelicula clasica, How the Grinch Stole Christmas.  Puede ser una peli retosa para estudiantes de inglés porque el escritor Dr. Seuss tenía una tendencia de crear palabras mentiras o usar palabras muy antiguas.  Abajo se encuentra la letra.  Adivina las palabras verdaderas!

You’re a Mean One, Mr Grinch (lyrics by Dr Seuss)

You’re a mean one, Mr.Grinch.
You really are a heel.
You’re as cuddly as a cactus,
You’re as charming as an eel.
Mr.Grinch.

You’re a bad banana
With a greasy black peel.You’re a monster, Mr.Grinch.
Your heart’s an empty hole.
Your brain is full of spiders,
You’ve got garlic in your soul.
Mr.Grinch.

I wouldn’t touch you, with a
thirty-nine-and-a-half foot pole.

You’re a vile one, Mr.Grinch.
You have termites in your smile.
You have all the tender sweetness
Of a seasick crocodile.
Mr.Grinch.

Given the choice between the two of you
I’d take the seasick crocodile.

You’re a foul one, Mr.Grinch.
You’re a nasty, wasty skunk.
Your heart is full of unwashed socks
Your soul is full of gunk.
Mr.Grinch.

The three words that best describe you,
are, and I quote: “Stink. Stank. Stunk.”

You’re a rotter, Mr. Grinch.
You’re the king of sinful sots.
Your heart’s a dead tomato splot
With moldy purple spots,
Mr. Grinch.

Your soul is an apalling dump heap
overflowing with the most disgraceful assortment
of deplorable rubbish imaginable,
Mangled up in tangled up knots.

You nauseate me, Mr. Grinch.
With a nauseous super-naus.
You’re a crooked jerky jockey
And you drive a crooked horse.
Mr. Grinch.

You’re a three decker saurkraut and toadstool sandwich
With arsenic sauce.

Real or Fake? Verdadera o de Mentiras?

Grinch

Heel

Cuddly
The Grinch, a Wasty Fellow

Eel

Monster

Foul

Seasick

Nasty

Wasty

Gunk

Rotter

Sot

Splot

Nauseous

Super-naus

Saurkraut

Toadstool

Did you guess which words were real and which were fake? We will make a list, check it twice. In our next we’ll tell you the fake ones and describe the vocabulary.

A Confused Grinch

Maybe you feel this way after the song!

Adivinaste cuales palabras son verdaderas y cuales son de mentiras? Hacemos una lista, chequeamos dos veces, y en la proxima entrada te contamos las de mentiras y compartimos los significados de los reales.

Do you know someone who is a Grinch? Maybe it’s because they don’t know English like you do.  Tell them about Bogota Business English.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.